1. HOME
  2. Institute
  3. Departments and Groups
  4. Department of Symbiosis
  5. Recent News

Poster prize for PhD student Adrien Assie

The Young Researchers in Life Science conference takes place every year at the Institut Pasteur in Paris. The conference brings together participants from diverse disciplines and topics, for a program which includes poster and oral presentations by young researchers, chaired and judged by senior scientists. This year the third prize for poster presentations was won by Adrien Assié for his poster "Diving into the genome of deep-sea intranuclear bacteria". Congratulations Adrien!

Friedrich Hirzebruch Prize awarded to Manuel Kleiner

January 2014: Manuel Kleiner, Postdoc in the Department of Symbiosis, received the Friedrich Hirzebruch Prize of the Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes (German National Academic Foundation) for his PhD thesis “Metabolism and evolutionary ecology of chemosynthetic symbionts from marine invertebrates”. The Friedrich Hirzebruch Prize is awarded once a year for an outstanding PhD thesis in the fields of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Engineering. The official award ceremony will be on May 19 2014 in Berlin.

Leibniz Award for Nicole Dubilier

05.12.2013
For more information see our press release (only in German) and the press release of the DFG.

Nicole Dubilier appointed Director at the Max Planck Institute in Bremen

15.11.2013
For more information see our press release.

ERC Advanced Grant awarded to Nicole Dubilier

Prof. Nicole Dubilier, Director of the Symbiosis Department, has been awarded a prestigious Advanced Grant from the European Research Council. The Grant will support her research on deep-sea Bathymodiolus symbioses with 2.5 Million Euros over five years. With this funding, Nicole aims to show the central role that symbiosis plays in the world's oceans, particularly in habitats such as the deep sea where resources for animal life are extremely limited.

For more information see our press release (only in German).

Nicole Dubilier was elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology

February 2013: Nicole Dubilier was elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology (see link). Fellows of the Academy are elected annually through a highly selective, peer-review process, based on their records of scientific achievement and original contributions that have advanced microbiology.

Symbiosis Group leader receives prestigious investigator award from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

December 3, 2012 – Prof. Dr. Nicole Dubilier from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology and MARUM of the University of Bremen, Germany, received the prestigious Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Marine Microbiology Initiative investigator award today. She is one of only 16 scientists selected through an open competition, and the only researcher from an institute outside of the USA. The award will provide 200,000 – 500,000 US dollars per year over five years to pursue pioneering research in the field of marine microbial ecology. The Marine Microbiology Initiative investigators were chosen through an extensive review process that considered over 180 applications. Awardees demonstrated creativity, innovation and potential to make major, new breakthroughs. “We’re providing some of the Louis Pasteurs of this field with additional, flexible funding—above and beyond that which they may already be receiving—to give them more freedom to pursue bold, new discoveries”, said Steve McCormick, president of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

For more information about the Initiative see here.
Click here to see the Max Planck Society press release.

A toxic menu - Marine worm feeds on carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulphide with the help of symbiotic bacteria

In a study that we published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science we show that a small marine worm, faced with a scarce food supply in the sandy sediments it lives in off the coast of Elba, must deal with a highly poisonous menu: this worm lives on carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulphide.

The worm, Olavius algarvensis, can thrive on these poisons thanks to millions of symbiotic bacteria that live under its skin. They use the energy from carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulphide to produce food for the worm. Read more

Original article (open access)
Nature Research Highlight
CNN
Die Zeit
Science Daily

From bits of science: "O. algarvensis and its symbionts can thrive in surroundings where other organisms would surely perish. In that it makes for a nice metaphore. Sometimes solid cooperation can turn even the most toxic situations into something productive."

Interview with Nicole Dubilier at the 'Frontiers in the Life Sciences' Symposium at Cornell University in April 2012

Nicole Dubilier was interviewed about her career and mentoring at a recent event celebrating the achievements of women in the life sciences at Cornell University - Frontiers in the Life Sciences. Find the interview here.

Our proposal to the 2011 Community Sequencing Program of the DOE Joint Genome Institute has been approved!

The proposal of Nicole Dubilier, together with two PhD students from the Symbiosis Group, Manuel Kleiner and Cecilia Wentrup, to the 2011 Community Sequencing Program of the DOE Joint Genome Institute (USA) was approved! The goal of the project, titled ''Understanding novel pathways for energy and carbon use in bacterial symbionts of gutless marine worms" is to sequence the genomes of 20 different symbionts from gutless marine oligochaetes.

Film about our research cruise with the RV Meteor to the Menez Gwen hydrothermal vent

Nicole Dubilier was the Chief Scientist of a MARUM-funded cruise to the Menez Gwen hydrothermal vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in 2010. A movie with highlights from the cruise was shown in the popular science magazine "W wie Wissen" of the nationwide TV channel 'Das Erste' on Sunday, October 23rd, 2011. Click here to watch.

Symbiosis Group member wins the Wolf Vishniac Award

Jillian Petersen, a Post-Doctoral Researcher in the Symbiosis Group, received the Wolf Vishniac Award for best presentation by a young investigator at the 20th International Symposium for Environmental Biogeochemistry in Istanbul, Turkey. Click here for more infomation about the conference, "Frontiers in Biogeochemistry".

Hydrogen highway in the deep sea

Symbiosis Group researchers discover hydrogen-powered symbiotic bacteria in deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussels.

The search for new energy sources to power mankind’s increasing needs is currently a topic of immense interest. Hydrogen-powered fuel cells are considered one of the most promising clean energy alternatives. While intensive research efforts have gone into developing ways to harness hydrogen energy to fuel our everyday lives, a natural example of a living hydrogen-powered ‘fuel cell’ has gone unnoticed. During a recent expedition to hydrothermal vents in the deep sea, researchers from the Symbiosis Group discovered mussels that have their own on-board ‘fuel cells’, in the form of symbiotic bacteria that use hydrogen as an energy source. Their results, which appear as the cover story in the August 11th issue of Nature, suggest that the ability to use hydrogen as a source of energy is widespread in hydrothermal vent symbioses.

Original article
News and Views article by Victoria Orphan and Tori Hoehler

This paper was reported in:
 
- Faculty of 1000
- Nature PodCast
- ScienceDaily
- Microbe World BacterioFiles
- German evening news (ZDF Heute Journal, beginning at ~23 minutes)
- German science radio (DRadio Wissen - "Wasserstoff als Energiequelle")
- Numerous German and international newspapers (e.g. Die Zeit, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, SpiegelOnline, msnbc)
- Science blogs (e.g. Jonathan Eisen's The Tree of Life)

Interview with Nicole Dubilier at ASM 2011 in New Orleans

Nicole Dubilier was interviewed in Episode #8 of the podcast This Week in Microbiology live from the 2011 ASM General Meeting in New Orleans and describes her research on symbioses between chemosynthetic bacteria and marine invertebrates. Find the interview here.

Symbiosis Group member wins regional FameLab competition

Dennis Fink, PhD student in the Symbiosis Group since 2009, joined the regional competition called FameLab in Hamburg and won first prize for his talk on symbiosis in the deep sea. Watch his 3-minute talk in the Hamburg final here, or listen to a radio interview with radioeins for more details.

FameLab Germany

News from our cruise to the Azores

We travelled on board the german research vessel FS METEOR to hydrothermal vents in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, close to the Azores Islands. There we conducted our research on the deep-sea underwater volcano Menez Gwen.

Read the blog written by Dr. Nicole Dubilier and watch videos by Dennis Fink on the news pages of the Hamburger Abendblatt. The english versions of the videos can be found here.

Article in the Max Planck Journal

Do Mediterranean tubeworms like it hot?

First discovery of tubeworms at hydrothermal vents outside of the Pacific Ocean
Christian Lott, Judith Zimmermann

In July 2006, a film team led by the renowned underwater documentarist Sigurd Tesche made a striking discovery during a cruise with the French research vessel MINIBEX: around one of the peaks of Europe’s biggest underwater volcanoes, the Marsili Seamount north of Sicily, they discovered deep-sea tubeworms. Singly, in bunches, and in thickets of hundreds of tubeworms, with lengths of up to half a meter. With the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) SUPER ACHILLE they video surveyed some hundred square meters of the seamount at depths between 500 and 600 meters. The main tubeworm field was on a small terrace of about 15 by 30 m2 on the otherwise steep basalt cliffs. The terrace was covered with fine beige sediment, interspersed with fist size and smaller fragments of basalt. Diffuse fluid venting was visible with a greyish-blue to black centre and a white halo of filamentous bacteria, resembling mats of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. As the cruise was focussed on filming, no samples were taken.

Deep-sea tubeworms at the Marsili seamountWhite halo of filamentous bacteria surrounding the tubeworms
Deep-sea tubeworms from the Marsili Seamount north of SicilyWhite mats of filamentous bacteria cover the rocks behind the tubeworms

The discovery of tubeworms at a hydrothermal vent in the Mediterranean is exciting because only vents in the Pacific Ocean are known to be colonized by tubeworms. In other oceans such as the Atlantic and the Indian Ocean, mussels, shrimp, and snails dominate the vent communities, but so far, no tubeworms have been found at vents outside of the Pacific. In the Atlantic and Mediterranean, tubeworms are only known from cold seeps in the Caribbean, along the continental margins of America and Africa and in the Eastern Mediterranean Basin. The Marsili tubeworms resemble the Lamellibrachia-like Vestimentifera, a group known almost exclusively from cold sulfide-rich deep-sea environments like gas seeps, mud volcanoes and continental margins. But on the flanks of an active volcano and in the Western Mediterranean where no tubeworms have yet been found?

The ROV MINIBEX
The ROV SUPER ACHILLE on back deck of the French RV MINIBEX

In July 2009 Sigurd Tesche invited us to join his next filming cruise to the Strait of Messina and, weather permitting, to collect tubeworms at the Marsili seamount. After a rough ride on the MINIBEX from Marseille to the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea through strong winds of 8 Bft we were extremely lucky to find the sea above the Marsili Seamount completely calm and it took only 20 minutes to find the tubeworm site with the ROV. Over the next two days we collected numerous tubeworms as well as fluid samples for biogeochemical and microbial analyses. These samples are now being investigated in our labs. Miriam Weber from the Microsensor Group is comparing data from biogeochemical analyses of the water samples and in situ microsensor measurements with video surveys of the Marsili vent to better understand how the fluids support the microbial and animal communities. Judith Zimmermann from the Symbiosis Group is using molecular methods to characterize the tubeworms and their bacterial symbionts as well as the free-living bacteria from the water samples. And we are all placing bets on whom the tubeworms will be most closely related to: their cold seep relatives from the Mediterranean or their hot vent relatives from the Pacific.

Collection of tubeworms
A good catch of tubeworms!