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LENNARD SCHADA VON BORZYSKOWAKI: "Understanding and engineering marine proteobacterial metabolism to address global sustainability challenges"

Invitation

Jan 30, 2020

Thursday, January 30, 2020

in Lecture Hall 2 (4012) at 3:00 p.m.

Lennart Schada von Borzyskowski
Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg
Department of Biochemistry & Synthetic Metabolism

will give a seminar with the title:
"Understanding and engineering marine proteobacterial metabolism to address global sustainability challenges"

Abstract

Lennart Schada von Borzyskowski (© Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg)
Lennart Schada von Borzyskowski (© Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg)

Steep chemical gradients have a major impact on multiple microbial processes in aquatic environments. Microsensors are excellent tools in measuring such gradients in 1D. Nevertheless, structurally complex environments frequently require 2D (or even 3D) measurements of the chemical microenvironments for a more profound understanding. Over the years, optical sensors (e.g. optodes) have become the method of choice for chemical imaging in 2D, although the full potential of this method has not even be exploited.

In this presentation I will outline the recent developments within the field. It is my ambition to span the bridge between material development and sensor application; following the progression of my research focus. I will introduce a variety of sensor platforms including planar optodes and (nano)-particle based sensors together with recent developments in imaging techniques. All those technological developments will be addressed by presenting recent results from a large variety of structurally complex aquatic environments. I will present how chemical imaging helps to understand processes within the rhizosphere of aquatic plants and how optical sensing can be combined with other methods to identify ecological niches. Finally, current limitations and possible future avenues towards novel optical sensors for currently unavailable analytes will be discussed.

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